FRAUD HELP DESK

THE DUTCH NATIONAL ANTI-FRAUD HOTLINE

Something fishy?
Report fraud to us between 09.00 and 17.00 Monday to Friday.
Confirmation_076133266.pdf

A short and cryptic message from a Brazilian account with the appropriate name ‘simplificando.com’ wants you to open an attachment. Don’t. This is not a confirmation letter at all, it’s a file that is likely to contain malware. Delete this message immediately.

  • #malicious software
  • #phishing
  • #simplificando.com
Example
PayPal: We need to verify your account information

“We need to verify your account information in order to continue using your account,” is the somewhat strange conclusion drawn by ‘PayPal’. Recipients are asked to click on a link to verify their account. The link, however, redirects to a totally unrelated web page: http://chico.co.th/un.php.

Don’t click on it. If you do, you may be directed to a fake website designed to get hold of your personal information. Or you run the risk of having your computer infected with malicious software. You don’t want either option. You’re therefore better off deleting this email.

  • #malicious software
  • #PayPal
  • #phishing
Example
Chrystal sends you SPAM

You’re likely to find an email from Chrystal in your spam box, where it belongs. After all, the subject clearly reads ‘[SPAM] paper’. And that’s pretty much all the information given in this textless message. Its purpose is probably to tempt you to open an attachment, if enclosed.

If not, Chrystal’s email simply makes no sense at all and you can keep it where you found it. And leave it there until its automatically trashed.

  • #Chrystal
  • #malicious software
  • #phishing
  • #spam
Example
Order_Schedule

“Attached, please find 2 Memos in the folder for purchase requests for our client M/s. Apollo Industries,” a new scam email from Malaysian company Powertec Industries. Don’t open these ‘memos’, and don’t order anything from Powertec.

This email is not what it seems to be. It’s a hoax, designed to get hold of your confidential details. The attachments may contain malicious software. Once installed, this malware may seriously damage your machine. Please delete this email straightaway.

  • #malicious software
  • #phishing
  • #Powertec
Example
Albert Heijn sends questionnaire and many misspellings

A translation engine can be very handy, but not when you’re an international con artist trying to penetrate the Dutch scamming market. Using translation software may result in misspellings and clunky sentences, as in the latest phishing email supposedly sent by Dutch supermarket chain Albert Heijn. The message is not only poorly crafted, the sender’s account is also weird: Albert Heijn uncomputableness@tRiGlYpHaL-205-205-nOnBuRgEsS.fLaPsHoRt.Us. Few people would fall for this scam, make sure you don’t either. Delete this email.

  • #AH
  • #Albert Heijn
  • #malicious software
  • #phishing
Example
FedEx: document delivery delay

“Our records indicate that the following package has encountered international clearance delays,” reads a strangely worded email pretending to come from Fedex. The tracking number is 80506***** and the packaging type: Your Packaging. Isn’t that odd? Well, perhaps even stranger is the question at the bottom of the message: “Won’t be in?”, or the answer: “You may be able to hold your delivery at a convenient FedEx World Service Center or FedEx Office location for pick up”.

Ignore this message, it’s a phishing scam designed to trick you into disclosing your user credentials and other personal details. Delete it immediately.

  • #FedEx
  • #malicious software
  • #phishing
Example