FRAUD HELP DESK

THE DUTCH NATIONAL ANTI-FRAUD HOTLINE

Something fishy?
Report fraud to us between 09.00 and 17.00 Monday to Friday.
PayPal Team: Confirmation | ‘Payment receipt return’

A messy message purporting to come from ‘PayPal Team’ opens with “Hello”, followed by the recipient’s email address. The unusual salutation should be seen as a red flag, just like the hyperlinks given in the message. This is a clear phishing message, crafted to get access to your PayPal account by tempting you to disclose your user credentials. Bin this email straightaway.

  • #email scams
  • #malicious software
  • #PayPal
  • #phishing
Example
Parcel International: Confirm your parcel

Scammers posing as Parcel International have cobbled together a classic phishing message. The email bears the usual hallmarks of a scam, including a general salutation (“Dear” followed by a comma), typos, exclamation marks and weird sentences. Other red flags are the inevitable hyperlinks and a big fat button urging you to “Confirm your parcel here”. Click on the button, it reads, “so that you can see what’s in the parcel”.

Use your common sense. Have you ordered anything? And, if you have, wouldn’t you know what might be in the parcel? Right, send this email straight into your trash folder and make sure you don’t click on any hyperlink. This may direct you to a counterfeit website where you will be asked to disclose confidential information such as your user credentials. Or you may have your machine infected with malicious software. Better safe than sorry, so delete this email.

  • #email scams
  • #malicious software
  • #Parcel International
  • #phishing
Example
Samsung: The delivery person is on his way to you

Scammers posing as Samsung are spamming out messages informing recipients that they won a prize. “We urgently request you to claim the prize within one day, otherwise we’ll be forced to contact the person next on our list and your prize will expire.” Yes, old-fashioned digital arm-wrestling: press the button now, or else.

The trouble, however, starts as soon as you click on the hyperlink. It will direct you to a fake website where you will see the brand new Galaxy S9+ which you will never receive. On the contrary, you will be asked to give up something valuable first: your personal details. These may include your banking information. In other words, this is a phishing message. Delete it immediately.

  • #email scams
  • #phishing
  • #Samsung
Example
Knab: This is your Knab alert

It urges you to request a new card before Christmas.

The message is well designed and has few spelling errors, making it look authentic and credible. It even contains a warning at the bottom not to give away any user credentials. The irony is that this email has been crafted to tempt you to do just that. This is a well-disguised phishing email. Delete is immediately.

  • #Knab
  • #malicious software
  • #phishing
Example
ICS: Verify account [#752074]

The absence of a personalised greeting gives away the latest scam email purporting to come from ICS. The company that process credit card payments is a hot favourite among phishers. Their aim is to get hold of your user credentials so that they can use your credit card and empty your bank account.

This time, they have opted for a lengthy letter with an exaggerated official tone. It even includes advice on how to protect yourself from phishing. This doesn’t include obvious red flags such as odd sentences, spelling mistakes or a strange layout. Don’t click on the links given in this email: you may be redirected to a counterfeit website and have your computer infected with malware. Delete this email right away.

  • #credit cards
  • #ICS
  • #malicious software
  • #phishing
Example
FedEx: Subject: #13115

“An email containing confidential personal information was sent to you” – this is the opening line of an email pretending to come from FedEx. It’s about personal information, but the message itself lacks a personal greeting. In fact, there is no salutation at all. Another red flag should be the sender’s email address, which begins with ‘bob’. And there are more unusual URLs hidden behind the hyperlinks given in this email. Its only objective is to get hold of your ‘confidential personal information’ so that the scammers who have crafted this can get access to your computer or transmit malicious software. Delete this email immediately.

  • #FedEx
  • #malicious software
  • #phishing scam
Example