FRAUD HELP DESK

THE DUTCH NATIONAL ANTI-FRAUD HOTLINE

Something fishy?
Report fraud to us between 09.00 and 17.00 Monday to Friday.
PayPal: You sent a payment of $ 125.00 USD

Sure, PayPal is known for its short messages and statements. But not for glaring typos and informal greetings (Hello). It’s a bank, after all. The ‘transaction confirm’ it is supposedly sending is simply an attempt to get hold of recipients’ user credentials and other confidential data. The practice is known as phishing. Therefore, never respond to such email messages. Bin them immediately.

ICS: your contact details are incomplete

ICS, the company that processes credit card payments, remains a phishing scammer’s favourite. And some of their messages are clearly fake. This one is a typical example: a messy layout, odd sentences, no personalised greeting and the admission that the scammers only want one thing: the recipient’s confidential data. Don’t respond to this phishing message. Delete it straightaway!

  • #ICS
  • #malicious software
  • #phishing scams
Example
ICS: double safe and secure

Why haven’t you activated your double security? It’s what ICS, the company that processes credit card payments, wants to know. One of its departments, aptly named International Card Services Fraud Prevention, doesn’t explain what this ‘double security’ boils down to. Nonetheless, as if to hammer it home, it uses the phrase half a dozen times. The urgent tone and the use of the recipient’s email account in the opening greeting are clear signs that this is a phishing scam. Delete this email straightaway.

  • #credit card scams
  • #ICS
  • #phishing emails
Example
Apologies from PostNL

Your parcel is on its way, according to a new scam email supposedly from Dutch postal services company PostNL. With its overall design and various copies of the official PostNL logo, the message looks authentic. There are a few red flags, though. One is the recipient’s first name (Charlotte), which appears in the subject line. Another is the urgent tone of an odd sentence that links to ‘the next page’. Of course, the juxtaposition of apologies for a late delivery and the demand to ‘confirm immediately’ should set your alarm bells ringing. This is obviously a phishing email, designed to get hold of your user credentials and other confidential information.

PayPal Team: Confirmation | ‘Payment receipt return’

A messy message purporting to come from ‘PayPal Team’ opens with “Hello”, followed by the recipient’s email address. The unusual salutation should be seen as a red flag, just like the hyperlinks given in the message. This is a clear phishing message, crafted to get access to your PayPal account by tempting you to disclose your user credentials. Bin this email straightaway.

  • #email scams
  • #malicious software
  • #PayPal
  • #phishing
Example
Parcel International: Confirm your parcel

Scammers posing as Parcel International have cobbled together a classic phishing message. The email bears the usual hallmarks of a scam, including a general salutation (“Dear” followed by a comma), typos, exclamation marks and weird sentences. Other red flags are the inevitable hyperlinks and a big fat button urging you to “Confirm your parcel here”. Click on the button, it reads, “so that you can see what’s in the parcel”.

Use your common sense. Have you ordered anything? And, if you have, wouldn’t you know what might be in the parcel? Right, send this email straight into your trash folder and make sure you don’t click on any hyperlink. This may direct you to a counterfeit website where you will be asked to disclose confidential information such as your user credentials. Or you may have your machine infected with malicious software. Better safe than sorry, so delete this email.

  • #email scams
  • #malicious software
  • #Parcel International
  • #phishing
Example